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Unsafe Places now

Afghanistan

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Afghanistan because of crime, terrorism, civil unrest and armed conflict. Travel to all areas of the nation is unsafe because of high levels of kidnappings, hostage taking, suicide bombings, widespread military combat operations, landmines and terrorist and insurgent attacks. The U.S. Embassy has a "severely limited" ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens there.



Central African Republic (CAR)

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to the Central African Republic because of crime and civil unrest. Violent crime – including armed robbery, aggravated battery and homicide – is common. Large areas of the country are also controlled by armed groups who the department says regularly kidnap, injure and, in the most extreme cases, kill civilians. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens there.



Iran

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Iran because of risk of arbitrary arrest and detention of U.S. citizens. U.S.-Iranians are particularly at risk as Iranian authorities continue to "unjustly detain and imprison" them. The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with Iran.



Iraq

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Iraq because of terrorism and armed conflict. American citizens face a high risk of violence and kidnapping in the country, where numerous terrorist and insurgent groups are active and attacks by improvised explosive devices occur often. The U.S. government has an extremely limited ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens there.



Libya

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Libya because of crime, terrorism, civil unrest and armed conflict. Crime levels are high in the country, and Westerners and U.S. citizens have been targets of kidnapping for ransom. Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Libya, and extremist groups have threatened American officials and citizens. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli suspended its operations in July 2014.



Mali

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Mali because of crime and terrorism. Violent crime – including kidnapping and armed robbery – is common in northern and central Mali. The concern is particularly high during local holidays, and terrorist and armed groups continue plotting kidnappings and attacks in Mali. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the northern and central regions of the country.



North Korea

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to North Korea because of the serious risk of arrest and long-term detention. Americans can't use a U.S. passport to travel to, in or throughout the country without a special validation from the U.S. Department of State. The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with North Korea, and Sweden serves as the protecting power for the U.S. there.



Somalia

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to Somalia because of crime, terrorism and piracy. Violent crime – including kidnapping and murder – is common throughout the country. Terrorists continue to plot kidnappings, bombings and other attacks in Somalia, and pirates are active in the waters off the Horn of Africa. The U.S. government doesn't have a permanent consular presence in the country, and has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens there.



South Sudan

Date of issue: Jan. 10, 2018
Expiration: None given.

What the department says: Don't travel to South Sudan because of crime and armed conflict. Violent crime – including carjackings, shootings, ambushes, assaults, robberies and kidnappings – is common through the nation and the capital, Juba. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in South Sudan.



More Information

A full list of travel advisories can be found here.

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